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  1. by on - Book review

    Book review of The Fate of Anatomical Collections, by Rina Knoeff & Robert Zwijnenberg

  2. by on - Book review

    Nasim investigates the process, back in the pre-1880 era before the introduction of the sensitive photographic plate, that converts what an observer sees through a telescope eyepiece, to the drawing the observer makes on a piece of paper, and then to the engraving or lithograph that is finally published.

  3. by on - Book review

    A review of the popular, comic-style illustrated book by Sydney Padua that fictionalises the lives of Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage and their invention of the first computer.

  4. by on - Book review

    A critical review of the publication Perfect Mechanics: Instrument Makers at the Royal Society of London in the Eighteenth Century, by Richard Sorrenson

  5. by on - Discussion

    This article discusses the concept of ‘heroism’ in relation to science, medicine and technology. It unpicks the complexities of the concept and discusses its implications for historians of science and museum professionals.

  6. by on - Discussion

    Charismatic objects provide invaluable, if challenging, resources for telling stories about the history of longitude at sea. In this article recent collaborative research and museum work is used to explore some opportunities and puzzles of the combination of object study and public exhibitions.

  7. by on - Discussion

    In this article, Luisa Massarani presents a brief panorama of science communication in Latin America and discusses some of the challenges for the field in the region.

  8. by on - Discussion

    How can invigorating research be reseeded in science museums? I believe that their investigative agendas can be rejuvenated through a focus on material culture, approached as authentic, singular opportunities for heightened aesthetic delving, and this marshalled through a programmed range of experiences, intelligences and disciplines.

  9. by on - Discussion

    Displays of instruments in science museums are closer to those of decorative arts artefacts than to the presentation of real functional and practical objects. This article offers a critique and suggests a path forward to go beyond functionless objects.

  10. by on - Discussion

    This article takes an exhibition I co-curated for the Science Museum and National Science and Media Museum as the starting point for a reflection on the relationships between neoliberal politics, the histories of photography, and the social meanings of science and technology.

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