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  1. by on - Review

    This reading guide maps the existing literature on energy history by focusing on changes in the scholarly understandings of the relationship between energy and culture. It aims to provide an entry point for thinking about energy’s past, present and future.

  2. by on - Review

    This article describes the author’s impressions of the new Royal Museum of Central Africa gallery. It discusses the successes and failures of the project, as well as its implications for UK museums.

  3. by on - Review

    Review: A museum by the people for the people? A review of St Fagans National Museum of History’s new galleries

  4. by on - Review

    Review: Behind the Exhibit: Displaying Science and Technology at the World’s Fairs and Museums in the Twentieth Century

  5. by on - Research

    A close examination of James’ Watt’s workshop, preserved in the Science Museum’s collections since 1924 and redisplayed in 2012, suggests a richer, more nuanced interpretation of his contribution to Britain’s Industrial Enlightenment as both philosopher and practical maker.

  6. by on - Research

    The Mercury capsule Freedom 7 was displayed at the Science Museum in 1965–66. This was well documented through photographs in addition to textual documents. This paper proposes an analysis of the exhibition in the light of these records.

  7. by on - Research

    Close inspection of William Bally’s miniature phrenological specimens – a set of 60 small plaster busts – has led to a reappraisal of their origin and use. Made in 1832, they helped position Bally as ‘one of the best practical phrenologists in England’.

  8. by on - Research

    In 1761–62, King George III commissioned a group of philosophical instruments from the London instrument-maker George Adams. This article traces Adams’s techniques of borrowing and adapting printed instrument designs, as he produced this spectacular collection.

  9. by on - Research

    This article reappraises the role of a now almost-forgotten exhibition of 1876 in building a vision for the permanent Science Museum, which was established nine years later. It argues that the exhibition promoted two apparently contrasting narratives about science used by founders, funders and lobbyists and circulating in the wider public sphere.

  10. by on - Research

    This essay draws on the Science Museum’s pictorial collections, in particular the excellent holdings of astronomical and meteorological images, in order to look again at the construction of objectivity, this time from the point of view of making and reproducing images.

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