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  1. by on - Research

    This is a study of the positive relationship between James Short and John Harrison, set in two eighteenth-century contexts: the notion of individual aptitude or ‘genius’ unspoilt by education or training; and the problem of how individual ability might be captured and formulated as public knowledge.

  2. by on - Book review

    A review of the popular, comic-style illustrated book by Sydney Padua that fictionalises the lives of Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage and their invention of the first computer.

  3. by on - Research

    This essay draws on the Science Museum’s pictorial collections, in particular the excellent holdings of astronomical and meteorological images, in order to look again at the construction of objectivity, this time from the point of view of making and reproducing images.

  4. by , on - Research

    This article explores how the process of aligning material and cultural ‘connections’ was crucial to defining different historical trajectories of domestic electrification in Canada and Japan. Detailing how connections were made and modified reveals the divergent and fluid meaning of living electrically across space and time.

  5. by on - Discussion

    Old weather: citizen scientists in the 19th and 21st centuries

  6. by on - Discussion

    This article discusses the concept of ‘heroism’ in relation to science, medicine and technology. It unpicks the complexities of the concept and discusses its implications for historians of science and museum professionals.

  7. by on - Research

    For the instrument makers of the early-nineteenth century there was no distinction between scientific and popular instruments. Exploring the case of the optician Phillip Carpenter, this article will address three popular media formats — the 1817 Kaleidoscope, 1821 Phantasmagoria Lantern and 1827 Microcosm.

  8. by on - Research

    In 1761–62, King George III commissioned a group of philosophical instruments from the London instrument-maker George Adams. This article traces Adams’s techniques of borrowing and adapting printed instrument designs, as he produced this spectacular collection.

  9. by on - Research

    This article reappraises the role of a now almost-forgotten exhibition of 1876 in building a vision for the permanent Science Museum, which was established nine years later. It argues that the exhibition promoted two apparently contrasting narratives about science used by founders, funders and lobbyists and circulating in the wider public sphere.

  10. by on - Review

    A review of the Ships, clocks and stars: the quest for longitude exhibition at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London.

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