You are viewing:

Sort by:

Browse results

  1. by on - Research

    This article reappraises the role of a now almost-forgotten exhibition of 1876 in building a vision for the permanent Science Museum, which was established nine years later. It argues that the exhibition promoted two apparently contrasting narratives about science used by founders, funders and lobbyists and circulating in the wider public sphere.

  2. by on - Review

    A review of the Ships, clocks and stars: the quest for longitude exhibition at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London.

  3. by on - Book review

    Nasim investigates the process, back in the pre-1880 era before the introduction of the sensitive photographic plate, that converts what an observer sees through a telescope eyepiece, to the drawing the observer makes on a piece of paper, and then to the engraving or lithograph that is finally published.

  4. by on - Book review

    A critical review of the publication Perfect Mechanics: Instrument Makers at the Royal Society of London in the Eighteenth Century, by Richard Sorrenson

  5. by on - Review

    Review of the exhibition Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee at the Royal College of Physicians

  6. by on - Review

    Review: Science and Technology galleries at National Museums Scotland

  7. by on - Discussion

    This paper introduces the three articles in this issue relating to Science City 1550–1800: The Linbury Gallery, which opened at the Science Museum, London, in 2019. It discusses the rationale behind the gallery and its relationship to collections and research.

  8. by on - Research

    Four seismographs now preserved in the collections of the Science Museum Group were originally installed at Eskdalemuir Observatory, Scotland, between 1908 and 1925. By attending to their provenance, this paper reconsiders the role of John Milne in forging international cooperation in seismology.

  9. by on - Review

    A review of Seven Ages of Science, aired on BBC Radio 4 between 6th August and 17th September 2013

  10. by on - Research

    This essay analyses representations of the ammoniaphone across nineteenth century advertising and the medical and musical press, and situates these representations within the broader Victorian fascination with the supremacy of Italian opera singers and the emergent corporeal anxieties of late nineteenth century consumer culture.

Browse by tag

All tags: