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  1. by on - Research

    The article explores the new way of seeing enabled by cycling in relation to the experience and temporality of late nineteenth century modernity, questioning how this influenced photographers’ approach to the representation of what was, effectively, a modern, moving, gaze.

  2. by on - Research

    This article analyses E C Large’s novel Dawn in Andromeda (1956), using it to explore the cultural history of the wireless. In the 1930s, the wireless figured as an instrument of fannish participation alongside participatory writing practices. By the 1950s it had become a disappointment.

  3. by on - Discussion

    Old weather: citizen scientists in the 19th and 21st centuries

  4. by on - Discussion

    This paper uses a discussion of the rationale of the selection for typefaces for a book on the subject of technologies and Romanticism to consider the extent to which typefaces might themselves be usefully considered to be technologies of romance.

  5. by on - Research

    An exploration of the buildings philanthropically funded by Sir Joseph Whitworth’s legacy and their impact on the development of Manchester’s built environment.

  6. by on - Research

    For the instrument makers of the early-nineteenth century there was no distinction between scientific and popular instruments. Exploring the case of the optician Phillip Carpenter, this article will address three popular media formats — the 1817 Kaleidoscope, 1821 Phantasmagoria Lantern and 1827 Microcosm.

  7. by on - Book review

    Book review: Physics and Psychics: The Occult and the Sciences in Modern Britain, by Richard Noakes

  8. by on - Research

    This article analyses the changing perceptions of European industrial museums as expressed in the reports written by the curators, directors and trustees of the New York Museum of Science and Industry between 1927 and 1937.

  9. by on - Discussion

    The economic aim of commercialisation of science has drawn attention to particular innovations. Science communicators and the public participate in this process. However, there are technologies that scientists and the public already value, that they could apply to global problems.

  10. by on - Research

    This article addresses how and why the Royal Society of Medicine (RSM), as a hub of research and education and with its multidisciplinary membership, became active in lantern projection, circulation and popularisation as a scientific teaching practice in First World War Britain.

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