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  1. by on - Discussion

    This article discusses the concept of ‘heroism’ in relation to science, medicine and technology. It unpicks the complexities of the concept and discusses its implications for historians of science and museum professionals.

  2. by on - Research

    This article analyses the changing perceptions of European industrial museums as expressed in the reports written by the curators, directors and trustees of the New York Museum of Science and Industry between 1927 and 1937.

  3. by on - Review

    A review of the award-winning performance piece by Mat Fraser, exploring how the kaleidoscopic juxtaposition of perspectives and communication, from lecture to rap, creates perhaps the most direct challenge to medical museums ever posed.

  4. by on - Review

    What is colour and how can science be used to investigate it?  An innovative family-learning hands-on exhibition at wissens.wert.welt (a small museum in Carinthia, Austria) allows children, teenagers and adults to explore colour using physics, chemistry, biology and art history.

  5. by on - Review

    Review: Science and Technology galleries at National Museums Scotland

  6. by on - Book review

    Book review

  7. by on - Review

    What do we want the content of a review section to be when the horizons and sources of historical content are broadening, and the constraints of the format are open?

  8. by on - Research

    The changing representation of disability, race and mental health in European medical museums and the under-representation of reproduction; ‘risks’ involved in exhibiting related collections, and strategies to help rehabilitate these topics and their material culture in the future medical museum.

  9. by on - Research

    An innovative storage building made from low-carbon, natural hygroscopic materials requiring minimal energy to achieve control of relative humidity to museum standards was built to house collections for the Science Museum Group.

  10. by on - Research

    Glass display cases in museums get a bad rap. For anyone wanting to evoke museums as old fashioned, expert-led broadcasters or as creating ‘mausoleums’ for objects by taking them out of the ‘immediacy of life’ the glass case is the perfect scapegoat. Glass display cases are the enforcers of the injunction ‘do not touch’.

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