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  1. by on - Research

    This article explores the medical context, editorial history and varied reader reception of an eighteenth-century pamphlet on scrofula written by John Morley, a wealthy Essex landowner.

  2. by on - Review

    Review: Behind the Exhibit: Displaying Science and Technology at the World’s Fairs and Museums in the Twentieth Century

  3. by , on - Research

    This article explores the use of reconstructed spaces and immersion at the Science Museum’s recent Collider exhibition. It sets out the challenges of engaging museum audiences with cutting-edge particle physics, describes the techniques adopted and evaluates their success.

  4. by on - Editorial

    Editorial Issue 05

  5. by on - Discussion

    In response to Robert Bud’s historical inquiry of applied science, this paper discusses whether it has been adopted in France. I argue that although the term was occasionally used in France it has never been successful because of the prestige of arts in the encyclopaedic movement.

  6. by on - Discussion

    How have museums of science and technology responded to the growing academic interest in their collections, and how have museum professionals contributed to the formation of new research agendas both inside and outside the walls of their respective institutions?

  7. by on - Book review

    A review of the popular, comic-style illustrated book by Sydney Padua that fictionalises the lives of Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage and their invention of the first computer.

  8. by , on - Research

    This research investigates how public participation in European science centres and museums is related to the emerging role of museums in science policy.

  9. by on - Discussion

    The economic aim of commercialisation of science has drawn attention to particular innovations. Science communicators and the public participate in this process. However, there are technologies that scientists and the public already value, that they could apply to global problems.

  10. by on - Research

    This article addresses how and why the Royal Society of Medicine (RSM), as a hub of research and education and with its multidisciplinary membership, became active in lantern projection, circulation and popularisation as a scientific teaching practice in First World War Britain.

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